L is for the Long Tail

L is for the Long Tail

“The theory of the Long Tail is that our culture and economy is increasingly shifting away from a focus on a relatively small number of ‘hits’ (mainstream products and markets) at the head of the demand curve and toward a huge number of niches in the tail.” (From The Long Tail, in a nutshell, by ...

K is for Kerning

K is for Kerning

Kerning is all about bringing things closer together. It’s the moment before the big event, the rising action, the build-up to when two letters, or two people, finally touch. In typography, letters are rarely “touching.” Rather, they’re approaching that point ever so gently, with each tap of the keyboard. It’s a little dance on the ...

J is for Juxtaposition

J is for Juxtaposition

Juxtaposition is the act of placing two unrelated things near each other in order to transfer desirable attributes from one item to another. In design, juxtaposition is used to create a visual and/or mental link between two unrelated things, often for the purpose of selling a not-so-good product or service. Applied to dating life, juxtaposition ...

I is for Iteration

I is for Iteration

Iteration means to try again and again until we reach a desired result. In design, we practice iteration very intentionally, always striving to improve. But in relationships, we often get stuck. We get bored, or complacent; we make assumptions about the way things ought to progress and we fault ourselves when things don’t work perfectly. ...

H is for Horror Vacui

H is for Horror Vacui

Many a good relationship or good design has been threatened by horror vacui: the fear of white space. If there is no white space in a design or a relationship, there is no room to breathe, or to illuminate beauty. The relationship between elements on a page, between forms in a building, or between individuals, ...

G is for Gradients

G is for Gradients

Design and relationships are all about subtlety, nuance, and details – they are complex curations. Just as there is a brilliant spectrum of colour, shape and story to play with in design, the gradient of emotion that can be shared between people in a relationship is seemingly infinite. Similarly, there are no true polars to ...

F is for Feedback

F is for Feedback

When was the last time you spoke completely honestly to someone – a client, a partner, or a friend? The mere thought of this vulnerability can seem horrifying, but feedback can also be incredibly rewarding. So what holds us back from giving serious feedback? Perhaps because it’s part of our culture to confrontation. We fear ...

E is for Empathy

E is for Empathy

Do you want your relationships, or your designs, to be more collaborative, meaningful and honest? Try practicing empathy. Empathy is our innate ability to perceive what another person is feeling. An important skill in both dating and design, empathy helps us to understand another person’s perspectives or emotions so we can better relate to their ...

D is for Diverge/Converge

D is for Diverge/Converge

The process of design involves a series of exploratory and narrowing phases, called divergence and convergence – visually represented as a double diamond. In the first diamond, the designer, or dater, is practicing divergence, exploring options. Then they narrow these down and converge into one direction, or partner. During the second diamond, the designer, or ...

C is for Constraints

C is for Constraints

A bit of well-applied constraint can set you free, in both dating and design. While it can sound fun to do a project with no limits and complete creative control, the designer’s job is far more interesting and creatively rewarding when it begins with a clear proposal, and defined constraints. Similarly, it can be tempting ...